Williams R% Swing Trade strategy for the Nasdaq/S&P 500 - GoTrade4me


A profitable Williams R% Swing Trade strategy for the Nasdaq/S&P 500 on the M15 chart involves the following entry and exit rules:

  1. Buy Entry: When the Nasdaq/S&P 500 on the M15 chart is in oversold territory as indicated by the Williams R% indicator being below -80, wait for a bullish cand pattern such as a Hammer, Bullish Engulfing or Bullish Pinbar to form on the chart.
  2. Sell Entry: When the Nasdaq/S&P 500 on the M15 chart is in overbought territory as indicated by the Williams R% indicator being above -20, wait for a bearish cand pattern such as a Hanging Man, Bearish Engulfing or Bearish Pinbar to form on the chart.
  3. Buy Exit: Close the long position when the Williams R% indicator starts to increase and the price starts to move below the moving average or when an opposite cand pattern appears on the chart.
  4. Sell Exit: Close the short position when the Williams R% indicator starts to decrease and the price starts to move above the moving average or when an opposite cand pattern appears on the chart.
  5. Trailing Stoploss: A trailing stoploss can also be used in this strategy by setting a certain percentage or dollar amount below the current market price for long positions and above the current market price for short positions. As the market moves in the favor of the trade, the stoploss will also move, allowing for a better exit in case of a sudden market reversal.

A different Williams R% Swing Trade strategy for the Nasdaq/S&P 500 on the M15 chart without using candle patterns could involve the following entry and exit rules:

  1. Buy Entry: When the Nasdaq/S&P 500 on the M15 chart is in oversold territory as indicated by the Williams R% indicator being below -80, enter a long position.
  2. Sell Entry: When the Nasdaq/S&P 500 on the M15 chart is in overbought territory as indicated by the Williams R% indicator being above -20, enter a short position.
  3. Buy Exit: Close the long position when the Williams R% indicator starts to increase and cross above -50 or when the price starts to move below the moving average.
  4. Sell Exit: Close the short position when the Williams R% indicator starts to decrease and cross below -50 or when the price starts to move above the moving average.
  5. Trailing Stoploss: A trailing stoploss can also be used in this strategy by setting a certain percentage or dollar amount below the current market price for long positions and above the current market price for short positions. As the market moves in the favor of the trade, the stoploss will also move, allowing for a better exit in case of a sudden market reversal.

If you intend to use both the M15 and H1 charts then this strategy could involve the following entry and exit rules:

  1. Buy Entry: When the Nasdaq/S&P 500 is in oversold territory as indicated by the Williams R% indicator being below -80 on both the M15 and H1 charts, enter a long position.
  2. Sell Entry: When the Nasdaq/S&P 500 is in overbought territory as indicated by the Williams R% indicator being above -20 on both the M15 and H1 charts, enter a short position.
  3. Buy Exit: Close the long position when the Williams R% indicator starts to increase and cross above -50 on both the M15 and H1 charts or when the price starts to move below the moving average on both the M15 and H1 charts.
  4. Sell Exit: Close the short position when the Williams R% indicator starts to decrease and cross below -50 on both the M15 and H1 charts or when the price starts to move above the moving average on both the M15 and H1 charts.
  5. Trailing Stoploss: A trailing stoploss can also be used in this strategy by setting a certain percentage or dollar amount below the current market price for long positions and above the current market price for short positions. As the market moves in the favor of the trade, the stoploss will also move

It’s important to note that the above is just one example of a potential trading strategy, and it may not be suitable for everyone. It’s always important to backtest any strategy before implementing it and also consult a financial advisor before making any financial decisions.

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